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IN THE MEDIA

The publication of The Street-wise Patient's Guide to Surviving Cancer

by Karol Sikora has been widely reported - here are details of some of  the coverage...

Print:

​Sunday Times interview with author - 22 May2016

Daily Mail feature - 24 May 2016

Daily Telegraph feature - 24 May 2016

The Times feature - 27 May 2016


Radio:

Talk Radio, author interview with Julia Hartley Brewer - 24 May 2016

Radio 5 Live, author interview (at 13:30) - 26 May 2016

Radio 2, author interview - 8 June 2016

Health Radio UK, author interview with Robin Daly - June 2016


Online:

http://healthmedicinet.com/i/ex-who-expert-karol-sikora-gives-stark-account-of-nhs-cancer-care/

http://aftercancers.com/2016/05/karol-sikoras-tips-on-dealing-with-the-nhs/​

https://www.veooz.com/news/xKxksvP.html





NEWS RELEASE

20 May 2016

Britain’s best-known cancer doctor tells patients “Get smart, if you want to survive cancer.”

Britain’s leading cancer specialist, Professor Karol Sikora, today offers “street-wise” advice on how to survive cancer.

It is, “Get smart!” He says that NHS patients must take control in demanding the best. They may not get it unless they do. Patients should not assume that the NHS necessarily does it for everyone.

This is especially urgent for the poor, who do least well in the NHS, he says. They are often on the wrong side of the “cancer survival divide.”

In his new book - The Street-wise Patient’s Guide to Surviving Cancer - Professor Sikora tells patients told that they have cancer: “You are about to go into a system. This system will not necessarily treat your cancer as quickly and effectively as possible unless you take charge of your own destiny.”

For the poor in particular, research has consistently shown that across all the main cancer types, UK patients at the deprived end of the socio-economic scale have less chance of surviving cancer than those at the affluent end.


Controversy continues about what is driving this cancer survival divide. But a combination of lack of understanding and difficulty navigating a complex, bureaucratic NHS system is likely to be to blame, Professor Sikora says.

In his jargon free, easy to read guide, Professor Sikora, attempts to give all patients the tools and information to get the best care. The book will be published on ​9 June 2016

The book takes an eye-opening and whirlwind tour of the UK and international cancer systems and the main cancer types. But always with the focus on patient education and empowerment.

 It includes detailed advice and notes on 100 information websites.

 Research has shown that:

 For women in England with breast cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For those aged 65 to 74 at diagnosis there is an 85.5% net survival rate of the most affluent. This is versus a 76.4% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years. There is an 80.2% net survival of the most affluent versus 69.1% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years.

Of those aged 55 to 64 at diagnosis, there was 90% net survival of the most affluent versus 85% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 84.9% net survival of the most affluent versus 79.9% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years.

For men in England with colon cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For those aged 55 to 64 at diagnosis - with 58% net survival of the most affluent versus 48.5% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 53.8% net survival of the most affluent versus 44.5% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years

For those men aged 45 to 54 at diagnosis, the deprivation gap was also high with 58.5% net survival of the most affluent versus 52.2% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 54.1% net survival of the most affluent versus 48.7% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years

For women in England with colon cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For those aged 15 to 44 at diagnosis - with 67.9% net survival of the most affluent versus 52.6% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 62.4% net survival of the most affluent versus 47.6% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years (but small proportion of diagnoses in this age range)

For those women aged 55 to 64 at diagnosis, the deprivation gap was also high with 59.5% net survival of the most affluent versus 50.8% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 55.9% net survival of the most affluent versus 44.3% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years

For women and men in England with lung cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For women aged 15 to 44 at diagnosis - with 28.1% net survival of the most affluent versus 20.2% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 23.7% net survival of the most affluent versus 18.6% net survival of the most deprived at 10

For men aged 45 to 54 at diagnosis, the deprivation gap was also high with 13.4% net survival of the most affluent versus 9.1% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 10.3% net survival of the most affluent versus 7.2% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years1

Five year survival from breast cancer among screening –eligible women in the West Midlands diagnosed from 1989 to 2011 of 90% for less deprived groups and 86.7% for middle and more deprived groups2

Review of 46 international studies (9 UK) published between 2005 and 2014 showed 33 (71%) of studies indicate significant association between low socioeconomic status and worst survival among prostate cancer patients3

 
References

 Nur, Ula, et al. "The impact of age at diagnosis on socioeconomic inequalities in adult cancer survival in England.” Cancer epidemiology 39.4 (2015): 641-649.
Morris, M., et al. "Ethnicity, deprivation and screening: survival from breast cancer among screening-eligible women in the West Midlands diagnosed from 1989 to 2011." British journal of cancer 113.3 (2015): 548-555.
Klein, Jens, and Olaf von dem Knesebeck. "Socioeconomic inequalities in prostate cancer survival: a review of the evidence and explanatory factors."Social Science & Medicine 142 (2015): 9-18.

 
The street-wise patient’s guide to surviving cancer.
How to be an active, organised, informed, and welcomed patient.

Karol Sikora
 
This book will be published on 9 June 2016.                                                   

ISBN 9781911204114 Paperback, £9.95.
ISBN 9781911204107 Hardcover, £30.00.
ISBN9781911204121 e-book, £7.99.