Media enquiries:

EER Publishers

T: 01825 740448

E: jr.spiers@btinternet.com

EER

Edward Everett Root Publishers Co. Ltd.


Independent Publishers Guild (IPG)

Interview with John Spiers

READ HERE!

Frankfurt Book Fair 2018

John and Leigh attended the immense Frankfurt Book Fair in October. They also visited Munich where they met with booksellers. At Frankfurt they saw many friends and met with important ‘trade’ contacts – notably Jason Brockwell, President of the National Book Network in America, and our very effective distributor in the USA and Canada.  They also met with colleagues from Ingram, one of the most important book-print suppliers to EER.

An important meeting was with Ray Qianrui JIANG  姜千蕊 | Rights Editor  版权编辑 of the large publishing firm HORIZON BOOKS, the Beijing Division of Shanghai Century Publishing Co., Ltd. EER has placed three of Peter Burke’s books with them, for immediate translation. We are discussing a number of other titles, and look forward to expanding our good relationship with them. Other meetings included that with Andrew Deering of Literature Ireland, discussing our growing list in Irish Studies.











Senior Staff news:

EER Publishers have appointed Robert Baldock as Consultant Editor. He began his career with John Spiers at The Harvester Press, and rejoins John after three decades as Academic Director at Weidenfeld & Nicolson and Managing Director at Yale University Press London.

The Mary Eliza Root Prize

Two years ago EER established this annual prize in association with the Victorian Popular Fiction Association.  It is in memory of John’s Great Great Grandmother, who died in the Hoxton Workhouse in the poorest part of East London as did two of her 14 children. She has no known grave;

The prize is intended to help young scholars with their reaches. It funds a stay at the Gladstone Memorial Library at Hawarden.

This year the Mary Eliza Root scholar is Lin Young, a PhD candidate at Queen’s University in Canada. Her project concerns the relationship between ghosts and objecthood in Victorian fiction. I argue that spiritualist experimentation into the ‘biology’ of the soul allowed Victorians to imagine themselves more readily as creatures of transmutable matter. The transfer of imagined ‘soul matter’ between the bodies of mediums, ghosts, and the objects assisting their communications allowed all three—the living, the dead, and the object—to be characterized as part of a process of biological assembly and disassembly. My project thus examines experiences of objecthood in supernatural fiction.

Lin says that “Gladstone’s Library contains dozens of primary writings on psychic research that will be valuable to Lin’s project. Among these are writings by Hudson Tuttle, E.W. Allen, William H. Harrison, and other reports of spirit ‘experiments.’  Specifically, Allen’s “Life beyond the grave, described by a spirit, through a writing medium” and Tuttle’s “Scenes in the spirit world, or, life in the spheres” will help me establish the material imagery of the spirit world for use in two dissertation chapters on objecthood in Wuthering Heights, A Christmas Carol, and The Picture of Dorian Gray. This prize would aid me in turning these two final dissertation chapters into two articles, as well as providing me with a solid foundation for my ideal post-doctoral project: a monograph that expands my research into ‘objecthood’ beyond the ghost story and into other popular Victorian genres, such as science fiction, fantasy, and detective fiction." 


Forthcoming Events:


2019 conferences: 

We will be exhibiting at a number of conferences, including:

The London Book Fair at the Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, 14-16 March 2019 [with the Independent Publishers Association.

The Victorian Popular Fiction Association annual conference at Senate House, University of London, 8-10 July 2019.

The Research Society for Victorian Periodicals conference at Brighton University, 25-27 July 2019.






IN THE MEDIA

The publication of The Street-wise Patient's Guide to Surviving Cancer

by Karol Sikora has been widely reported - here are details of some of  the coverage...



Print:

​Sunday Times interview with author - 22 May2016

Daily Mail feature - 24 May 2016

Daily Telegraph feature - 24 May 2016

The Times feature - 27 May 2016


Radio:

Talk Radio, author interview with Julia Hartley Brewer - 24 May 2016

Radio 5 Live, author interview (at 13:30) - 26 May 2016

Radio 2, author interview - 8 June 2016

Health Radio UK, author interview with Robin Daly - June 2016


Online:

http://healthmedicinet.com/i/ex-who-expert-karol-sikora-gives-stark-account-of-nhs-cancer-care/

http://aftercancers.com/2016/05/karol-sikoras-tips-on-dealing-with-the-nhs/​

https://www.veooz.com/news/xKxksvP.html



​​NEWS RELEASE 


20 May 2016

Britain’s best-known cancer doctor tells patients “Get smart, if you want to survive cancer.”

Britain’s leading cancer specialist, Professor Karol Sikora, today offers “street-wise” advice on how to survive cancer.

It is, “Get smart!” He says that NHS patients must take control in demanding the best. They may not get it unless they do. Patients should not assume that the NHS necessarily does it for everyone.

This is especially urgent for the poor, who do least well in the NHS, he says. They are often on the wrong side of the “cancer survival divide.”

In his new book - The Street-wise Patient’s Guide to Surviving Cancer - Professor Sikora tells patients told that they have cancer: “You are about to go into a system. This system will not necessarily treat your cancer as quickly and effectively as possible unless you take charge of your own destiny.”

For the poor in particular, research has consistently shown that across all the main cancer types, UK patients at the deprived end of the socio-economic scale have less chance of surviving cancer than those at the affluent end.

Controversy continues about what is driving this cancer survival divide. But a combination of lack of understanding and difficulty navigating a complex, bureaucratic NHS system is likely to be to blame, Professor Sikora says.

In his jargon free, easy to read guide, Professor Sikora, attempts to give all patients the tools and information to get the best care. The book will be published on ​9 June 2016

The book takes an eye-opening and whirlwind tour of the UK and international cancer systems and the main cancer types. But always with the focus on patient education and empowerment.

 It includes detailed advice and notes on 100 information websites.

 Research has shown that:

 For women in England with breast cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For those aged 65 to 74 at diagnosis there is an 85.5% net survival rate of the most affluent. This is versus a 76.4% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years. There is an 80.2% net survival of the most affluent versus 69.1% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years.

Of those aged 55 to 64 at diagnosis, there was 90% net survival of the most affluent versus 85% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 84.9% net survival of the most affluent versus 79.9% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years.

For men in England with colon cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For those aged 55 to 64 at diagnosis - with 58% net survival of the most affluent versus 48.5% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 53.8% net survival of the most affluent versus 44.5% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years

For those men aged 45 to 54 at diagnosis, the deprivation gap was also high with 58.5% net survival of the most affluent versus 52.2% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 54.1% net survival of the most affluent versus 48.7% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years

For women in England with colon cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For those aged 15 to 44 at diagnosis - with 67.9% net survival of the most affluent versus 52.6% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 62.4% net survival of the most affluent versus 47.6% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years (but small proportion of diagnoses in this age range)

For those women aged 55 to 64 at diagnosis, the deprivation gap was also high with 59.5% net survival of the most affluent versus 50.8% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 55.9% net survival of the most affluent versus 44.3% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years

For women and men in England with lung cancer, the deprivation gap was widest:

For women aged 15 to 44 at diagnosis - with 28.1% net survival of the most affluent versus 20.2% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 23.7% net survival of the most affluent versus 18.6% net survival of the most deprived at 10

For men aged 45 to 54 at diagnosis, the deprivation gap was also high with 13.4% net survival of the most affluent versus 9.1% net survival of the most deprived at 5 years, and 10.3% net survival of the most affluent versus 7.2% net survival of the most deprived at 10 years 1

Five year survival from breast cancer among screening – eligible women in the West Midlands diagnosed from 1989 to 2011 of 90% for less deprived groups and 86.7% for middle and more deprived groups 2

Review of 46 international studies (9 UK) published between 2005 and 2014 showed 33 (71%) of studies indicate significant association between low socioeconomic status and worst survival among prostate cancer patients 3

 References

​1 Nur, Ula, et al. "The impact of age at diagnosis on socioeconomic inequalities in adult cancer survival in England.” Cancer epidemiology 39.4 (2015): 641-649.
Morris, M., et al. "Ethnicity, deprivation and screening: survival from breast cancer among screening-eligible women in the West Midlands diagnosed from 1989 to 2011." British journal of cancer 113.3 (2015): 548-555.
Klein, Jens, and Olaf von dem Knesebeck. "Socioeconomic inequalities in prostate cancer survival: a review of the evidence and explanatory factors."Social Science & Medicine 142 (2015): 9-18.
 
The Street-wise Patient’s Guide To Surviving Cancer
How to be an active, organised, informed, and welcomed patient.
Karol Sikora 

see/order here...